Hardwood Forestry Fund Members know that wood is a renewable resource, and that healthy, vibrant forests provide benefits to wildlife, the environment, and to people.

Demonstration Forest Woodlot/ Bailey Hill Woodlot, ME


Demonstration Forest Woodlot/ Bailey Hill Woodlot, ME

The May 2008 project created a legacy – by establishing a sustainable hardwood forest. The project manager says “The education the children involved in this project received from the natural resource professionals may last a lifetime.” 

Volunteers hand planted American chestnut, red oak, and bur oak trees at demonstration forest woodlot sites in Williamsburg Township. This educational project encourages community volunteers to be involved in the establishment and management of local natural resources and to promote species composition that will prove viable during climate change. 

Project partners include Piscataquis County Soil and Water Conservation District, Small Woodland Owners Association of Maine, Maine Forest Service, Maine Chapter of the American Chestnut Society, and the Lifejackets Program of the Charlotte White Center, which trains teenagers in outdoor wildnerness skills to achieve Junior Maine Guide Certification. 

This project is proudly sponsored by all Hardwood Forestry Fund members.

  • Project Initiation Date: May-08
  • Location: Demonstration Forest Woodlot/ Bailey Hill Woodlot , ME
  • Number of Trees: 3510
  • Number of Acres: 4
  • Tree Species: Northern red oak, bur oak, American chestnut
  • Project Partner: Piscataquis County (Maine) Soil and Water Conservation District

Raystown Lake, PA


Raystown Lake, PA

Project proudly sponsored by Armstrong World Industries.

The spring 2009 project planted red oak, black cherry, sugar maple, and tulip poplar seedlings in sunny gaps in the understory of an existing mature forest. This planting effort increases species diversity to promote long term sustainability of the site. The current forest has experienced regeneration problems due to heavy deer browse of young natural tree regeneration.

Efforts to fence a portion of the area and to reduce pressure from deer will enable the newly planted young seedlings and natural regeneration to capture the site and to become vital components of the next generation of forest. Establishing a diverse young forest will improve wildlife and timber values and resist specific pest damage.

This educational planting and management project demonstrates sustainable forest management techniques including tree planting, competition control, and deer management. Project partners include U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Friends of Raystown Lake, Armstrong World Industries, Pennsylvania Conservation Corps, Ruffed Grouse Society, Pennsylvania Game Commission, and Hardwood Forestry Fund.

  • Project Initiation Date: spring , fall 2009
  • Location: Raystown Lake , PA
  • Number of Trees: 7500
  • Number of Acres: 80
  • Tree Species: Red oak, Black cherry,Sugar maple, Tulip poplar
  • Project Partner: US Army Corps of Engineers

University of Arkansas – Monticello


University of Arkansas – Monticello

Project proudly sponsored by Armstrong World Industries.

The February 2009 Arkansas planting project creates two species diverse forests on abandoned field sites. Benefits of the tree planting include improved wildlife habitat, forestry education, and timber production. By planting native hardwoods that include nut and acorn producing trees, the emerging forest will provide an excellent food source for wildlife. This project also has a strong educational component because it demonstrates to private landowners and forestry students techniques for planting and caring for high value hardwoods. Pine trees native to Arkansas are included in the planting mix to increase forest diversity, to shade the soil and help reduce weed competition, and to encourage upward growth of the hardwood trees. The sites were planted by hand and also by machine.  Project partners include University of Arkansas School of Forest Resources, University of Arkansas Southwest Research and Extension Center, US Fish & Wildlife Service, and Hardwood Forestry Fund.

  • Project Initiation Date: Feb-09
  • Location: University of Arkansas; US Army Corps of Engineers , AR
  • Number of Trees: 10252
  • Number of Acres: 18
  • Tree Species: nuttall oak, cherrybark oak, black walnut, pecan, shortleaf pine(nurse crop)
  • Project Partner: University of Arkansas- Monticello

Purdue University Stephens Property, IN


Project proudly sponsored by Armstrong World Industries.

This forest management project uses a technique called ”timber stand improvement” to improve growing conditions for young red oak, white oak, walnut, and cherry trees. By removing competing poorer quality trees, the hardwood trees will have more available sunlight, soil nutrients, and water for growth.  This project also creates regeneration openings that allow sunlight to reach the forest floor.  The openings benefit growth and regeneration of tree species that require ample sunlight.  The well-timed work of this project has long term benefits both on the future regenerated areas and the vigor of the residual stand of timber.  This educational project promotes knowledge and stewardship of Indiana’s natural resources.

Project partners include: Purdue University Forestry and Natural Resources Department, Purdue University Extension Service, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Fish & Wildlife, Society of American Foresters, Indiana Forest & Woodland Owners Association, and the Hardwood Forestry Fund.

  • Project Initiation Date: January-March 2009
  • Location: Purdue University Stephens Property , IN
  • Number of Trees: 60000
  • Number of Acres: 75
  • Tree Species: oak sp., Black walnut, Black cherry, Tulip poplar, hickory
  • Project Partner: Purdue University

Western Maryland 4-H Education Center, MD


This cooperative tree planting project tests the viability of a hybrid chestnut developed by the Maryland Chapter of the American Chestnut Foundation.  This test planting is important because of its elevation and topography in one of the coolest climates in Maryland.  It also has educational benefits to visitors of the 4-H camp because it demonstrates seedling planting and maintenance techniques.  If successful, this plantation will become an important seed orchard that can produce seed needed for additional chestnut tree planting.

The American chestnut tree was one of the most important hardwood trees in eastern United States’ forests. In the early 1900′s, the chestnut blight disease (caused by a fungus) spread from New York throughout the entire American chestnut range and caused significant destruction.  Many efforts have been made to develop a disease resistant hybrid.  The American Chestnut Foundation and its many local volunteers establish test plantations. These plantations are planted, monitored, and supervised by volunteers in numerous geographic locations throughout the US. 

Why is it important to develop a chestnut with characteristics similar to the American chestnut but with disease resistance?  The American chestnut tree was highly valued by people and wildlife.  The tree grew large and relatively quickly, the wood is easy to work and very durable, and the flavorful chestnuts are eaten by people and wildlife.   

Project partners include Western Maryland 4-H Education Center, Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service, and The American Chestunt Foundation- Maryland Chapter.

This project is proudly sponsored by all Hardwood Forestry Fund members.

  • Project Initiation Date: Apr-08
  • Location: Western Maryland 4-H Education Center , MD
  • Number of Trees: 109
  • Number of Acres: 1
  • Tree Species: American Chestnut hybrid
  • Project Partner: The American Chestnut Foundation, MD DNR- Forest Service

Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center ( HTIRC), IN


Please check back soon for more information about this project.

  • Project Initiation Date: Apr-08
  • Location: Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center ( HTIRC) , IN
  • Number of Trees: 4480
  • Number of Acres: 6
  • Tree Species: Black walnut, white pine(nurse crop)
  • Project Partner: HTIRC Hdwd Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center

Raystown Lake PA


Please check back soon for more information about this project.

  • Project Initiation Date: April May 2008
  • Location: Raystown Lake PA , PA
  • Number of Trees: 7000
  • Number of Acres: 60
  • Tree Species: Red oak, Black cherry, Sugar maple, Tulip poplar
  • Project Partner: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Douglas Hallock Stewardship Demonstration Forest, WI


Douglas Hallock Stewardship Demonstration Forest, WI

The Wisconsin project manager applied to the Hardwood Forestry Fund for a grant to help ensure oak as a major component in the  understory of a maturing forest.  The project is located on a site that has good soils for oak growth, with site indexes from 50 to 65 for red oak.  The Hallock Demonstration Forest is used to demonstrate forest management techniques to private landowners who want to pro-actively manage their forests. Planting crews hand planted native hardwood seedlings in open spots in the maturing forest.  This project helps ensure quality and diverse hardwoods are a component of the next forest.

  • Project Initiation Date: 12-Apr-08
  • Location: Douglas Hallock Stewardship Demonstration Forest , WI
  • Number of Trees: 33000
  • Number of Acres: 37
  • Tree Species: red oak, black walnut, black cherry
  • Project Partner: State of Wisconsin

Michigan State University MacCready Reserve, MI


Please check back soon for more information about this project.

  • Project Initiation Date: April 2010, 2011, 2012
  • Location: Michigan State University MacCready Reserve , MI
  • Number of Trees: 12000
  • Number of Acres: 12
  • Tree Species: red oak, white oak, burr oak, black cherry
  • Project Partner: Michigan State University

Flambeau River State Forest – Wisconsin, WI


Please check back soon for more information about this project.

  • Project Initiation Date: June July 2008
  • Location: Flambeau River State Forest - Wisconsin , WI
  • Number of Trees: 25000
  • Number of Acres: 10
  • Tree Species: natural regeneration -sugar maple, red maple, basswood, white ash, yellow birch
  • Project Partner: Wisconsin DNR

The Hardwood Forestry Fund is a 501 (c) (3) educational foundation that establishes sustainable forests for future generations' natural resource needs. Contributions are tax-deductible.

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